LATEST ADDITIONS

John Atkinson  |  Sep 15, 1999  |  0 comments
"There, that's where you should put the microphone—5" from the end of my bow."
 |  Sep 12, 1999  |  126 comments

Sony announced last week that they are lowering the price of their latest SACD player to $3500. Is this the right price to get your attention?

At what price would you seriously consider buying an SACD player? Why?
$5000
2% (5 votes)
$3500
4% (9 votes)
$2999
3% (7 votes)
$1999
12% (28 votes)
$1499
13% (31 votes)
$999
27% (65 votes)
$499
23% (55 votes)
$299
2% (6 votes)
Less than $299
15% (35 votes)
Total votes: 241
Stereophile Staff  |  Sep 12, 1999  |  0 comments
Back in 1985, J. Gordon Holt wrote: "It seems, these days, that many of us audiophiles have become so preoccupied with the minutiae of sound reproduction that we haven't even noticed that it doesn't sound like music any more." He was talking about the obsession with soundstaging and detail at the expense of musical accuracy. In "Getting the Notes Right (Midrange Madness)," he renders his lesson in classic JGH style, observing that "I have played on this old saw in these pages for so many years that it has turned into a dead sawhorse, but somehow the message never seems to get through. There should be no harm done by beating it into the ground a little farther."
Barry Willis  |  Sep 12, 1999  |  0 comments
CD recorders are the hottest ticket in audio at the moment. Philips and Marantz once dominated the category, but other manufacturers have recently jumped on board with their own versions, among them Pioneer and Harman/Kardon. Onkyo will introduce its DX-RD511 dubber later this month at the 1999 CEDIA Expo in Indianapolis. The machine is expected to arrive in stores in October—just in time for the holiday season.
John Atkinson  |  Sep 12, 1999  |  0 comments
J. Gordon Holt founded Stereophile in the fall of 1962 in order to promote the idea that the optimal way to judge audio components was to do what end users did: listen to them. Since then, Gordon has had an unbroken relationship with Stereophile, through its sale to Larry Archibald in 1982, my coming on board as editor in 1986, the sale of the magazine to Petersen Publishing in 1998, and the subsequent sale of Petersen to Emap in 1999. Through all this time he has been listed on the magazine's masthead as "Founder & Chief Tester." (A fascinating interview with Gordon, conducted by his associate and friend Steven Stone, can be found in this website's "Archives.")
Jon Iverson  |  Sep 12, 1999  |  0 comments
Earlier this month, at the Internationale Funkausstellung 1999 in Berlin, Germany, Syrinx music & media announced that, together with Panasonic/Technics and their new DVD-Audio players (see previous story), they successfully presented the world's first DVD-Audio disc. The Internationale Funkausstellung 1999 ran from August 28 until September 5 under the theme of "Your World of Consumer Electronics."
Barry Willis  |  Sep 12, 1999  |  0 comments
More than a million CD recorders have been sold in the last 21 months, making the category one of the most rapidly developing segments in the history of the consumer electronics industry. The news was delivered by Philips executives at the end of August at the IFA trade and consumer exhibition in Berlin, Germany.
Stereophile  |  Sep 05, 1999  |  95 comments

Last week's Soapbox inspired this week's question: Which do you prefer

What is your favorite type of CD packaging? Why?
Plastic jewel boxes
60% (126 votes)
Cardboard sleeves (like DigiPaks)
18% (37 votes)
Other formats (explain)
7% (15 votes)
I don't really care
6% (12 votes)
Hate them all
10% (20 votes)
Total votes: 210
Jon Iverson  |  Sep 05, 1999  |  0 comments
The year was 1956, and Elvis had just finshed his set on the December 15 Louisiana Hayride radio show. Elvis was one of a half-dozen acts that were broadcast that night on KWKH, the radio station that originated Hayride. After his encore, Elvis left the stage and the crowd went wild—so wild that they would not stop screaming for more of the soon-to-be king of rock'n'roll. Because several acts on the bill had not yet performed, the show's announcer, Horace Logan, went to the microphone in an attempt to quiet the audience, and ended up making a little music history.
Barry Willis  |  Sep 05, 1999  |  0 comments
A quarter-million dollars' worth of recording and duplicating equipment and hundreds of thousands of counterfeit compact discs and cassette tapes were just part of the booty seized by New York's Suffolk County police in what has been called the "biggest bust of bootleg music in US history." Twelve people were arrested in raids during the first week of September at warehouses in Manhattan, Queens, and Long Island.

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