Mytek Brooklyn Bridge streaming DAC/network server Specifications

Sidebar 1: Specifications

Description: Streaming digital-to-analog converter with network-server capabilities, with analog preamplifier, headphone amplifier, and MM/MC phono stage. Digital inputs: Wireless, Ethernet, 2 S/PDIF (RCA), S/PDIF (TosLink), S/PDIF- DSD (2-channel pair), USB2 Type B (high-resolution audio), USB-A (for attaching storage). Analog/phono inputs: 1 pair single-ended (RCA). Analog outputs: 1 pair balanced (XLR), 1 pair single-ended (RCA). Headphone outputs: 1 ¼" stereo (2), 6W, convertible to 1 pair balanced. Formats/ sample rates supported: PCM to 32-bit/44.1, 48, 88.2, 96, 176.2, 192, 384kHz (wireless and Ethernet limited to 192); DSD; DSD (via USB only) to 2.8224, 5.6448, 11.2896MHz (wireless and Ethernet limited to 2.8224). Dynamic range: 130dB. Analog output impedance (RCA and XLR): 50 ohms.
Dimensions: 8.5" (216mm) W by 1.875" (47.6mm) H by 10" (254mm) D with antenna. Weight: 3.9lb (1.76kg).
Finishes: Silver, Black.
Serial number of unit reviewed: 04019-00063.
Price: $2995. Approximate number of dealers: 25. Warranty: 2 years.
Manufacturer: Mytek HiFi, 148 India Street, First Floor, Brooklyn, NY 11222. Tel: (347)384-2687. Web: mytekdigital.com.

COMPANY INFO
Mytek HiFi
148 India Street, First Floor
Brooklyn, NY 11222
(347)384-2687
ARTICLE CONTENTS

COMMENTS
Bogolu Haranath's picture

If you believe (or, don't believe), that you can buy Greenland, just like Alaska for 2 cents an acre or, just like Louisiana for 3 cents an acre, then believe me, I can sell you the (Mytek) Brooklyn Bridge for $2,995 in 2019 .........

Yours truly,
George C. Parker :-) ........
(No relation to Peter Parker the Spider-Man) :-) ........

Anton's picture

Great review.

I still haven't wrapped my head around "bridge."

Bogolu Haranath's picture

A partial denture ....... According to Wikipedia :-) .........

Jim Austin's picture

Broadly, a bridge simply translates from one audio format to another Specifically, in the network context, a bridge takes audio data delivered via TCP/IP--either wired Ethernet or Wi-Fi--and renders it into standard audio data and delivers it via a standard audio interface. So, for example, in PS Audio's DirectStream DAC, the Bridge II is an add-in card that takes an Ethernet input and delivers audio data (via I2S? I'm not sure) to the DAC itself. This Mytek calls itself "Brooklyn Bridge" but in fact it's a Bridge-DAC combination.

Jim Austin, Editor
Stereophile

Bogolu Haranath's picture

It certainly would be hard to wrap around the king of all bridges, the Danyang-Kunshan Grand Bridge, which is 102.4 miles long ......... The world's longest bridge :-) .........

Bogolu Haranath's picture

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Bogolu Haranath's picture

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Bogolu Haranath's picture

BTW ....... A variant of stoptail bridge is a 'wraparound bridge', used in some guitars :-) ...........

Bogolu Haranath's picture

Gold Note DS-10, at approx. the same price, is a close competitor for Mytek Brooklyn Bridge :-) ...........

dcolak's picture

I stopped reading there.

Anton's picture

I admire your efficiency.

Bogolu Haranath's picture

'Bridge Over Troubled Water'? :-) ..........

TJ's picture

Thanks Jim for your review. Congrats to Mytek on its EISA award, even if some may think that Mytek is going deeper into a Swiss Army knife direction. If they're using the ConversDigital network module (?), a Brooklyn+ with a small external bridge like ultraRendu or SOtM Neo could be a cleaner NADAC solution in terms of SQ and noise.

Jim Austin's picture

I too have found wi-fi in general to be of limited utility. But given what I take to be the target market for something like this it probably makes sense. It certainly reflects the same design approach as including a phono preamp. To me though, "kitchen sink" is a little uncharitable (although I can tell it's not intended to be unkind). I think they have a particular customer in mind: Think compact system in a Williamsburg, Brooklyn, condo, with a couple of standmounts or small-footprint floorstanders and a simple TT.

[Edit: Thought I should add: This doesn't mean it won't work for other scenarios of course; it does have an Ethernet port after all, which is how I mainly used it.]

Jim Austin, Editor
Stereophile

Bogolu Haranath's picture

Off topic ....... But, may be Jim Austin could review the new Parasound Halo JC-5 stereo amp ($6,000), and tell us how JC-5 works with the Revel Salon2 speakers? :-) ........

Bogolu Haranath's picture

Following the JC-5 review, may be Jim Austin could also review the new matching Parasound Halo JC-2 BP pre-amp ($5,000) :-) .......

TJ's picture

Understood. I'm a big fan of Mytek, have two of their DACs.

jaiello's picture

The fact that Mytek is using ConverseDigital for their Bridge is disappointing. They do such a terrible job on the PS Audio Bridge II that no one should use them. I told Michel this a year ago before I knew that a Bridge product was coming. I guess he didn't care as he was probably already down the road with them. I would really love to know what the limitation is for either Bridge that they can't do higher rate DSD than DSD64.

rwwear's picture

...the only company with enough sense to put HDMI on their high res DACs?

pmilner's picture

If I read this paragraph correctly, to use Roon together with the Brooklyn Bridge I don’t need a computer/ NUC, just an iPad. If this is true, where does the Roon Core reside?

jaiello's picture

You still need to host the Roon Core on a NUC or other device. The Brooklyn Bridge just replaces the streamer in that set up.

Jim Austin's picture

If I read this paragraph correctly, to use Roon together with the Brooklyn Bridge I don’t need a computer/ NUC, just an iPad.

No. As i wrote near the beginning of that section:

but Roon must run in a separate box, either a regular, multifunction computer or a dedicated server, ...

However, with the Brooklyn Bridge (and similar products) you can use a set of standards called uPnP (Universal Plug 'n Play) to send music directly to the Bridge/DAC without a separate box OR Roon. It's not as elegant nor as versatile as Roon, but it's cheaper that way and it works--with limitations on direct-connected (but not networked) music storage as noted in the review.

Jim Austin, Editor
Stereophile

tonykaz's picture

DACs are the King's New Suit kind of product as far as I can tell.

I've been buying DACs for a few years now and still haven't discovered much difference between any of the ones I own.

I think that I'll just use ( borrow ) your adverbs : " aspires to and approaches neutrality". I'll probably substitute all manner of descriptives for your "neutrality" which seems too neutral to be descriptive.

Still, I don't like talking about DACs because I don't know what I'm talking about and I can't quite hear much difference between them. I haven't found a bad one, yet!

Thanks for trying

Tony in Venice

ps. "aspires to and approaches neutrality" is itself the best piece of writing in this Issue, in my opinion, a scientific equivalent to water. PH 7.0

Bogolu Haranath's picture

'Neutrality' most likely means, not adding it's own sound ........ Not editorializing the sound, which is passed through the component .........

Welcome back, Tony :-) ...........

Bogolu Haranath's picture

Not 'Vitamin Water' :-) ........

tonykaz's picture

The British Pound is now at $1.19, rapidly approaching it's low of $1.05 in the 1980s when I was Importing Air Containers of British HiFi and selling thru at one Turn per Week!, 52 Turns per year !!! phew.

Tony in Venice ( closely following Global Business )

ps. much of Brit. HiFi is now Chinese HiFi with China and it's BRIC partners leaning to Gold Standard instead of Paper Currency Standards based on GDP. We ( Washington ) is not winning the Trade War with China, tariffs are increasing, pain is being felt. Petrol Dollar is loosing it's grip, Juan is gaining.

Verito's picture

Roon for $499? Those were the times! Since release 1.7 it‘s a whopping $699 = an increase of 40%
And I thought the tendency of software prices are rather to go down over time.... well I was wrong.

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