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High Fidelity Magnet Cables

For now, I'll file this one under "interesting if it were true," since I can't verify the unique claims about these cables. But the main display certainly caught my eye. You can see the sci-fi looking metal enclosures in the above photo that the Texas company's Casey Whitworth says is the Professional Series Elite Interconnect. The large metal enclosures are Faraday cages surrounding the cable "so we can pile them on top of each other and not have issues with the magnets."

Whitworth explains that the cables use neodymium N52 rare-earth magnets to eliminate skin effect and focus the electrons. "All of our products use magnetic conduction so you can loom an entire audio system from the source (AC) all the way to your speaker cables. The effect is cumulative. The more magnetism we can get in the system, the better."

I'll quote from the literature: "Unlike anything before, our cabling tech uses a powerful array of magnets to preserve your audio signal . . . We call this magnetic conduction . . . the free electrons in the electrical audio signal are so powerfully attracted to the guiding forces of our magnetic array that they are pulled to the extreme center of the conductor. The electrons are unable to break free from the magnetic pathway of the cables. This means noise, distortion, and external EMI is simply overpowered by the magnetic conductance tech . . ."

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The company has a complete line of cables, adaptors and power conditioners and prices range from $399 for the cheapest digital cable to the tens of thousands of dollars for the "Professional Series" speaker cables. They also offer 30-45 demo periods for in-home evaluation.

COMMENTS
music or sound's picture

I am somewhat perplexed how a Faraday cage can shield magnetic fields. Many cable companies are really good in inventing new science!

cgh's picture

We used to build counter Helmholtz coils for atom trapping applications. (One of my few forays away from working in theory.) Maybe that's what they meant... Actually, that's a product idea. Patent pending. My IP.

spacehound's picture

...pseudo-scientific gibberish.

If it was true where's his Nobel Prize :-) :-)

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